Networking is different for disability leaders

Disability Leaders face some distinct barriers to networking

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By Christina Ryan – DLI CEO

 

Networking is a key element of leadership work and produces many of the opportunities that we all want to take up, so it’s a vital skill and ability for all of us to be engaged in.

 

Many leadership opportunities arise because someone knows someone and the network circles around to you. If you aren’t part of those networks then you are significantly disadvantaged.

 

Networking can be different for people with disabilities and the DLI 2016 survey of leaders illustrated a number of barriers to networking that we face, for example:

 

– the costs associated with attending

– the extra hours and energy needed – many events happen after hours

– being in the mainstream / prejudice

– crowds, noise.

 

These are just some of the issues raised as barriers to being in the room and being able to network effectively.

 

There are now a number of apps that scan business cards to assist leaders who need alternative formats or who can’t carry cards, but not all are suitable for the needs of leaders with disabilities, so don’t assume technology solves everything.

 

The cost of networking is a distinct barrier that is very difficult to overcome. If you can’t afford to be in the room, regularly, then you won’t get to meet the people that you need to meet. People quickly forget someone that isn’t seen often, and that means they forget that you might be a suitable candidate for something. While online social networking does assist in some ways, it simply doesn’t replace being in the room and meeting people.

 

Above all, networking is something you get better at with practice. So, barriers experienced by leaders with disabilities must be addressed so that we can get the practice, and through that get the opportunities that networking provides.

Christina Ryan is the Founder of the Disability Leadership Institute, a specialist leadership and coaching consultant, and a 2017 Westpac Social Change Scholar

Disability Leaders in the Mainstream

Being in the room is vital for disability leaders

By Christina Ryan – DLI CEO

 

The 2016 survey of disability leaders found that most leaders with disabilities are operating in disability specific places not in the mainstream.

 

What’s behind this? Is the mainstream unwelcoming, or perhaps it’s not interested in disability. Maybe it’s just inaccessible. Is it easier to get employment in disability specific fields? Whatever the reason, the few leaders who do work in the mainstream said that they feel very isolated and are constantly battling to be respected and included.

 

Working in the mainstream confronts all the prejudices and access barriers that people with disabilities face every day. It forces people to accept you, but to also consider how disability is relevant to whatever the mainstream area is. You are also more likely to be an expert or specialist in your field, so people will need to adjust how they respond to you. Being the only person with disability in a room can be exhausting, but it is also the place where change happens.

 

Leaders working in the mainstream have told the Disability Leadership Institute many stories including:

 

– being treated like the work experience kid

– having your disability being the only topic of conversation

– getting stuck in a crowded room and unable to move

– general inaccessibility preventing meaningful participation

– doubting your non-disability expertise

 

These are just some examples of the barriers faced by leaders working in the mainstream. It can take a strong stomach and real persistence to continue to operate in such environments, but the outcomes are valuable and often make real change for our community.

 

Our next webinar, Mainstreaming – being in the room, is looking at how to work in the mainstream effectively and with confidence. We’ll examine how you can get the most out of being the only person with disability in the room and how to use your presence to get strong disability outcomes.

 

The webinar will cover:

– Being in the room.

– Key principles to being in the mainstream

– How to communicate

– What to communicate

– Why are you in the room?

– Making sure you stay in the room.

– Using your presence to increase the representation of people with disabilities

 

Christina Ryan is the founder of the Disability Leadership Institute and a 2017 Westpac Social Change Scholar.

Contribution for panel Enter Stage Rights: Strengthening Disability Advocacy Conference

Equality is the thing

Melbourne – 2 September 2016

 

By Christina Ryan – DLI CEO

I need to make a personal declaration before I begin: I’m the CEO of an independent disability advocacy organisation funded by NDAP, who is also an NDIS participant, and who has also been part of the disability rights movement for over 20 years. There aren’t too many of us who are doing all of those things so it provides me with a rare perspective and it means I can’t divorce my work from my understanding of what it’s like to be a dependent person with disability.

So let’s look at rights based advocacy or disability services.

I want to ditch the term “person centred”? I see it as ableist language that indicates passive people with disabilities should sit and wait for someone else to deliver services to them in a certain way. Urk.

Hands up everyone here who is a human being?

Well now, that means you have human rights, and you have the same rights as every other human being. Simple as that, no compromises, no need to earn them or deserve them. You just have them. Doesn’t matter who you are, where you live, or what you are doing today, you have the same rights as all the other human beings.

When we talk about rights based advocacy delivery at Advocacy for Inclusion we start from first principles. Rather than building advocacy and then applying a rights framework to that, we start with rights and everything else follows.

To do this we need to understand what fundamental human rights principles are.

Not the CRPD but the framework that it hangs off, the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. First up in the Universal Declaration is the statement that we are all equal.

As in everyone, everyone is equal. That means people with disabilities, including the people that we all work with who might have cognitive disabilities or significant communication barriers. Everyone is equal to everyone else.

How does this influence advocacy practice or disability service delivery?

It means the person drives their own space, whether it’s decisions about resolving a barrier or issue, or whether its decisions about what their supports look like and who delivers them. They drive it.

This is because the next fundamental principle to consider is self-determination. This is a tough one for all of us because the whole system we work within has evolved over a couple of centuries to deny people with disabilities self-determination.

As we move deeper into the 21st century Australia is still a long way short of equality and self-determination for people with disabilities.

There are also different levels of self-determination: in advocacy we mainly work at the individual level and think about a single person being self-determined, but don’t forget that self-determination is also a key rights concept in regards to population groups or communities. So, we must also consider self-determination for people with disabilities collectively.

The real challenge for advocacy and service provider organisations is to make equality and self-determination real. To do this we need to stand back and do what the CRPD asks of us, which is to provide support for people to make their own decisions, to live the lives they choose, and be part of the community just like everyone else.

More challengingly I believe we also need to understand that self-determination will never be realised until people with disabilities are the ones making the decisions about the services and the advocacy organisations. Not just individually but collectively as a group within our community.

How many of you have a majority of people with disabilities on your board, or on your staff, or even as your members? Until this happens we are not even close to self-determination. The sector which supports us should also be by and for us.

That is your role and your challenge. It is what you need to be working towards if you truly think people with disabilities are equal and have the same rights as everyone else.

Christina Ryan is the Founder of the Disability Leadership Institute and was the CEO of Advocacy for Inclusion at this time.

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